O filii et filiae

This hymn was written by Jean Tisserand, O.F.M. (d. 1494) and originally had only nine stanzas. Stanzas “Discipulis adstantibus”, “Ut intellexit Didymus”, “Beati qui non viderunt” are early additions to the hymn. There are several different versions of the hymn. The one below is one of the more common versions.
Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia. Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia.
O filii et filiae,
Rex caelestis, Rex gloriae
morte surrexit hodie.

R. Alleluia

Ye sons and daughters of the Lord,
the King of glory, King adored,
this day Himself from death restored.

R. Alleluia

Ex mane prima Sabbati
ad ostium monumenti
accesserunt discipuli.

R. Alleluia

All in the early morning gray
went holy women on their way,
to see the tomb where Jesus lay.

R. Alleluia

Et Maria Magdalene,
et Iacobi, et Salome
Venerunt corpus ungere

R. Alleluia

Of spices pure a precious store
in their pure hands these women bore,
to anoint the sacred Body o’er.

R. Alleluia

In albis sedens angelus
praedixit mulieribus:
In Galilaea est Dominus.

R. Alleluia

The straightaway one in white they see,
who saith, “seek the Lord: but He
is risen and gone to Galilee.”

R. Alleluia

Et Ioannes apostolus
cucurrit Petro citius,
monumento venit prius.

R. Alleluia

This told they Peter, told John;
who forthwith to the tomb are gone,
but Peter is by John outrun.

R. Alleluia

Discipulis astantibus,
in medio stetit Christus,
dicens: Pax vobis omnibus.

R. Alleluia

That self-same night, while out of fear
the doors where shut, their Lord most dear
to His Apostles did appear.

R. Alleluia

Ut intellexit Didymus
quia surrexerat Iesus,
remansit fere dubius.

R. Alleluia

But Thomas, when of this he heard,
was doubtful of his brethren’s word;
wherefore again there comes the Lord.

R. Alleluia

Vide Thoma, vide latus,
vide pedes, vide manus,
noli esse incredulus.

R. Alleluia

“Thomas, behold my side,” saith He;
“My hands, My feet, My body see,
and doubt not, but believe in Me.”

R. Alleluia

Quando Thomas vidit Christum,
pedes, manus, latus suum,
dixit: Tu es Deus meus.

R. Alleluia

When Thomas saw that wounded side,
the truth no longer he denied;
“Thou art my Lord and God!” he cried.

R. Alleluia

Beati qui non viderunt
et firmiter crediderunt;
vitam aeternam habebunt.

R. Alleluia

Oh, blest are they who have not seen
their Lord and yet believe in Him!
eternal life awaitheth them.

R. Alleluia

In hoc festo sanctissimo
sit laus et iubilatio:
benedicamus Domino.

R. Alleluia

Now let us praise the Lord most high,
and strive His name to magnify
on this great day, through earth and sky:

R. Alleluia

Ex quibus nos humillimas
devotas atque debitas
Deo dicamus gratias.

R. Alleluia

Whose mercy ever runneth o’er;
Whom men and Angel hosts adore;
to Him be glory evermore.

R. Alleluia

Today’s Introit: Resurréxi

Introitus
Ps 138:18; 138:5-6.
Resurréxi, et adhuc tecum sum, allelúja: posuísti super me manum tuam, allelúja: mirábilis facta est sciéntia tua, allelúja, allelúja.
Ps 138:1-2.
Dómine, probásti me et cognovísti me: tu cognovísti sessiónem meam et resurrectiónem meam.
V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculórum. Amen
Resurréxi, et adhuc tecum sum, allelúja: posuísti super me manum tuam, allelúja: mirábilis facta est sciéntia tua, allelúja, allelúja.

Introit
Ps. 1:38; 1:18; 1:5-6
I arose, and am still with Thee, alleluia; Thou hast laid Thy hand upon me, alleluia; Thy knowledge is become wonderful, alleluia, alleluia.
Ps. 138. 1, 2
Lord, Thou hast searched Me and known Me; Thou knowest my sitting down and My rising up.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
R. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
I arose, and am still with Thee, alleluia; Thou hast laid Thy hand upon me, alleluia; Thy knowledge is become wonderful, alleluia, alleluia.

INSTRUCTION ON EASTER

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INSTRUCTION ON EASTER

The Church’s Year
By Rev. Fr. Leonard Goffine

What is the festival of Easter?

Easter, in Latin Pascha, signifies passing over, and has the following historical origin: Under Pharao, King of Egypt, the Jews in that country groaned under intolerable bondage. God had mercy on His people, and the hour of deliverance came. By His com­mand the first-born of all the Egyptians was killed by an angel. The Jews had been ordered by God to be ready for emigration, but first to kill a lamb, eat it in their houses in common, and sprinkle the door­posts with its blood. And the angel of death, by order of God, passed the doors sprinkled with the blood of the lamb, and did no harm to any child of the Israelites, whilst he slew all the first-born sons of the Egyptians. In grateful memory of this passing their doors, the Jews observed the festival of Easter, the Pasch, or Passover. After the death of Jesus, the apostles introduced the same festival into the Church in grateful remembrance of the day on which Jesus, the true Easter Lamb, took away our sins by His blood, freed us from the angel of eternal death, and passed us over to the freedom of the children of God. Continue reading

THE SPIRITUAL RESURRECTION 

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THE SPIRITUAL RESURRECTION

INTRODUCTION. St. Paul addressed these words to the faithful of Corinth, from Ephesus, around Easter time toward the end of his third missionary journey. He is referring to the Jewish custom of excluding all leaven from their houses before celebrating the Pasch, and he tells his Christian readers to celebrate the coming feast of the Resurrection of our Lord, by excluding from their souls the leaven of sin and wickedness, and by feasting with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth. In other words, the Apostle is reminding the faithful of Corinth that the way to celebrate the new Pasch, the Feast of Easter, is to have their souls free from sin and adorned with the grace of Christ. As Christ, from the state of natural death, rose glorious and immortal on Easter Sunday, so the Christian, who wishes to be associated with his risen Lord and worthily to keep the great feast of the Resurrection, should rise from the state of sin and moral death to that of grace and life. Continue reading

Easter Sunday

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Easter Sunday

By Father Francis Xavier Weninger

As often as the Church, in commemoration of the glorious Resurrection, celebrates the yearly recurrence of the Paschal time, and entones the joyous Alleluia with her children, so often do we recall to mind those privileged souls who, the Gospel tells us, had the happiness of hearing the glad tidings: “Jesus, lives; He has arisen,” of listening to,of beholding the risen Jesus. This privilege was not limited to one or two; but was enjoyed by a number of the disciples, who believed and hoped in the Lord. Often, too, we go in spirit to the sepulcher with the holy women who went thither bearing ointments, and think of that bliss which filled their hearts when, from the angel of the Lord, they heard the welcome words: “He is arisen.” We think of Mary Magdalen, whose joy found utterance in the single word, as she knelt before her Lord, “Rabboni.”

We behold the wondering Apostles, when, on the evening of the same day, as they were assembled together “with closed doors,” their Master stood before them and pronounced the blessed words: “Pax vobis”–“Peace be unto you.” Continue reading