Saint Marcellus

Saint Marcellus, the Centurion and His Children

Martyrs
(† 298)

It is believed that Saint Marcellus was born in Arzas of Galicia. A brave pagan, he entered upon the career of arms, hoping to gain a large fortune. He married a young lady named Nona and they were blessed with twelve children. Saint Marcellus was a valorous solider and was promoted to the charge of centurion; he had no thought for any advancement except the sort pertaining to his military life, when he heard the fervent preaching of a holy bishop of the church of Leon. He was converted with his entire family to the Christian religion. All of them except his wife would soon give their blood in honor of their Faith.

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Saint Narcissus

Saint Narcissus

Bishop of Jerusalem
(† Second Century)

Saint Narcissus from his youth applied himself with great care to the study of both religious and human disciplines. He entered into the ecclesiastical state, and in him all the sacerdotal virtues were seen in their perfection; he was called the holy priest. He was surrounded by universal esteem, but was consecrated Bishop of Jerusalem only in about the year 180, when he was already an octogenarian. He governed his church with a vigor which was like that of a young man, and his austere and penitent life was totally dedicated to the welfare of the church.

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Saints Simon and Jude

Saints Simon and Jude

Apostles and Martyrs
(† First Century)

The Apostle, Saint Simon

Simon was a simple Galilean, a brother of Jesus, as the ancients called one’s close relatives — aunts, uncles, first cousins; he was one of the Saviour’s four first cousins, with James the Less, Jude and Joseph, all sons of Mary, the wife of Alpheus, or Cleophas, either name being a derivative of the Aramaic Chalphai. The latter was the brother of Saint Joseph, according to tradition. All the sons of this family were raised at Nazareth near the Holy Family. (See the Gospel of Saint Matthew 13:53-58.) Simon, Jude and James were called by Our Lord to be Apostles, pillars of His Church, and Joseph the Just was His loyal disciple.

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Saint Evaristus

Saint Evaristus

Pope and martyr
(† 108)

Saint Evaristus succeeded Saint Anacletus on the throne of Saint Peter, elected during the second general persecution, under the reign of Domitian. That emperor no doubt did not know that the Christian pontificate was being perpetuated in the shadows of the catacombs. The text of the Liber Pontificalis, says of the new pope:

Evaristus, born in Greece of a Jewish father named Juda, originally from the city of Bethlehem, reigned for thirteen years, six months and two days, under the reigns of Domitian, Nerva and Trajan, from the Consulate of Valens and Veter (96) until that of Gallus and Bradua (108). This pontiff divided among the priests the titles of the city of Rome. By a constitution he established seven deacons who were to assist the bishop and serve as authentic witnesses for him. During the three ordinations which he conducted in the month of December, he promoted six priests, two deacons and five bishops, destined for various churches. Evaristus received the crown of martyrdom. He was buried near the body of Blessed Peter in the Vatican, on the sixth day of the Calends of November (October 25, 108). The episcopal throne remained vacant for nineteen days.

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A Jealous God

A Jealous God

Jeffrey Dahmer (d. 1994, aka “The Milwaukee Monster”) was one of the most infamous serial killers in the United States. In 1991 he was convicted for the brutal torture and murder of sixteen people. In most cases, he had cannibalized his victims, and in some cases performed necrophilia. Dahmer was a sodomite and had also been convicted of child molestation. On November 28, 1994, he was bludgeoned to death by a fellow inmate (it is believed the guards knew the inmate’s intentions and allowed the killing to take place, so as to rid the world of such a monster).  The day after Dahmer was killed, the TV show Dateline NBC broadcast an interview they had conducted with him earlier that same year. The transcript of that interview is quite an eye-opener.

Dahmer had been a convinced atheist. He admitted that his disbelief in God led him to commit those horrid crimes:

If you don’t…think there is a God to be accountable to, then…what’s the point of trying to modify your behavior to keep it in acceptable ranges? That’s how I thought anyway. I always believed the theory of evolution as truth, that we all just came from slime. When we…died, you know, that was it, there was nothing. (Quote from the transcript of an interview with Jeffrey Dahmer on Dateline NBC, broadcast 11/29/1994).  After his trial, Dahmer found he could not explain his feelings of guilt; of right and wrong, against his atheistic worldview. He started reading the Bible. He became a “born again” Protestant. In that final interview, Dahmer stated, “I’ve since come to believe that the Lord Jesus Christ is truly God, and I believe that I, as well as everyone else, will be accountable to him (sic).” (Ibid—Dahmer claimed he was “prepared to die” and didn’t deserve to live after what he had done).  

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