Our Lady, Mother of Grace

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Our Lady, Mother of Grace
Our Lady of the Bowed Head

Among the many miraculous images of the Mother of God through which she deigns to grant her favours, there is one in the monastery church of the Carmelites in Vienna, entitled the Mother of Grace, or Our Lady of Grace, also known also as Our Lady of the Bowed Head.

In 1610 a Carmelite, Dominic of Jesus-Mary, found among the votaries of an old altar in the monastery church of Maria della Scala in Rome and oil painting of the Mother of God, dust-covered and somewhat torn, which grieved him. Taking it into his hands, he shook the dust off it, and kneeling down venerated it with great devotion.
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Mary, Our Queen, Our Mother

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Mary, Our Queen, Our Mother

Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae!

St. Alphonsus Di Liguori
from The Glories of Mary

How great should be our Confidence in Mary, who is the Queen of Mercy. As the glorious Virgin Mary has been raised to the dignity of Mother of the King of kings, it is not without reason that the Church honors her, and wishes her to be honored by all, with the glorious title of Queen.

“If the Son is a king,” says St. Athanasius, “the Mother who begot him is rightly and truly considered a Queen and Sovereign” (“Si ipse Rex est, qui natus est de Virgine, Mater quae eum genuit, Regina et Domina proprie ac vere censetur.”–Serm. de Deip). “No sooner had Mary,” says St. Bernardine of Sienna, “consented to be Mother of the Eternal Word, than she merited by this consent to be made Queen of the world and of all creatures.” (“Haec autem Virgo, in illo consensus, meruit primatum orbis dominium mundi, sceptrum regni super omnes creaturas.”–Pro fest. V.M. s. 5 c. 3.) “Since the flesh of Mary,” remarks the Abbot Arnold of Chartres, “was not different from that of Jesus, how can the royal dignity of the Son be denied to the Mother?” (Nec a dominatione et potestate filii Mater potest esse sejuncta: una est Mariae et Christi caro.”–De Laud. B. Virg.) “Hence we must consider the glory of the Son, not only as being common to his Mother, but as one with her” (Filii gloriam cum Matre non tam communem judico, quam eamdem.”–Ibid.). Continue reading