Saint Boniface

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Saint Boniface

Bishop, Martyr
(680-754)

Saint Boniface was born in Devonshire, England, in the year 680. Some missionaries staying at his father’s house spoke to him of heavenly things and inspired in him a desire to devote himself, as they did, to God. He entered the monastery of Exminster and was trained there for his apostolic labors. His first attempt to convert pagans in Holland having failed, he went to Rome to obtain the Pope’s blessing on his mission, and returned with the authority to preach to the German tribes.
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Saint Francis Caracciolo

Saint Francis Caracciolo

Founder
(1563-1608)

Saint Francis was born in the kingdom of Naples in 1563, of the princely family of Caracciolo. In childhood he shunned all amusements, recited the Rosary regularly, and loved to visit the Blessed Sacrament and to distribute his food to the poor. To avoid idleness, however, he engaged in hunting, which pastime was not pleasing to God; and Our Lord, to detach him from the world, sent him a terrible trial. When he was 22 years old, he developed leprosy and soon was on the brink of death. Seeing his body in this deplorable condition taught him contempt for the vanity of the world and of youth’s physical strength, and he promised God to serve Him alone if he were cured. The illness disappeared almost at once. He therefore left his parents, sold his portion of the inheritance for the benefit of the poor, and went to study for the priesthood at Naples. He dedicated himself in particular to visiting prisoners and galley-slaves and preparing criminals for death; he spent his leisure hours visiting the Blessed Sacrament in unfrequented churches.
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Pentecost Thursday

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Pentecost Thursday

Fire, a Symbol of the Effects of the Graces of the Holy Ghost

Rev. John Evangelist Zollner, 1911

There appeared to them parted tongues as it were of fire, and it sat upon every one of them.–Acts 2: 3.

We celebrate the feast of Pentecost, on which the Holy Ghost, in the form of fiery tongues, came down upon the Apostles and the other believers. Why did the Holy Ghost choose the form of fire? There certainly is a mystery contained in it, for whatever God does has its reason and significance. St. Luke did not in vain record the fact that on the feast of Pentecost there suddenly came a sound from heaven, as of a mighty wind coming, and that there appeared parted tongues, as it were, of fire, and that it sat upon each of them.–Acts 2: 2, 3. Fire symbolizes the effects which the Holy Ghost produced in the first believers on the day of Pentecost, and which He still produces in the hearts of Christians. The effects of grace, symbolized by fire, shall be the subject of our meditation to-day. Fire has three effects:
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