Saint Cyril of Alexandria

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Saint Cyril of Alexandria

Doctor of the Church
(376-444)

Born at Alexandria, Egypt, and nephew of the patriach of that city, Theophilus, Cyril received a classical and theological education at Alexandria and was ordained by his uncle. He accompanied Theophilus to Constantinople in 403 and was present at the “Synod of the Oak” that deposed John Chrysostom, whom he believed guilty of the charges against him.
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Saint Apollonia

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Saint Apollonia

Virgin and the Martyrs of Alexandria
(† 249)

At Alexandria, in 249, a mob rose in savage fury against the Christians, during a persecution which the pagans of Alexandria instigated at the urging of a magician of that city. Metras, an old man, perished first. His eyes were pierced with reeds, and he was stoned to death. A woman named Quinta was the next victim. She was led to a heathen temple and told to worship; she replied by cursing the false god many times, and she too was stoned to death. After this the houses of the Christians were sacked and plundered; and they accepted the despoiling of their possessions with joy.
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INSTRUCTION FOR SEPTUAGESIMA SUNDAY

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INSTRUCTION FOR SEPTUAGESIMA SUNDAY

The Church’s Year
By Rev. Fr. Leonard Goffine

Why is this Sunday called “Septuagesima”?

Because in accordance with the words of the First Council of Orleans, some pious Christian congregations in the earliest ages of the Church, especially the clergy, began to fast seventy days before Easter, on this Sunday, which was therefore called Septuagesima” – the seventieth day. The same is the case with the Sundays following, which are called Sexagesima, Quinquagesima , Quadragesima, because some Christians commenced to fast sixty days, others fifty, others forty days before Easter, until finally, to make it properly uniform, Popes Gregory and Gelasius arranged that all Christians should fast forty days before Easter, commencing with Ash Wednesday Continue reading