Pope St. Hyginus

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Pope St. Hyginus

Reigned about 138-142; succeeded Pope Telesphorus, who, according to Eusebius (Church History IV.15), died during the first year of the reign of the Emperor Antonius Pius — in 138 or 139, therefore. But the chronology of these bishops of Rome cannot be determined with any degree of exactitude by the help of the authorities at our disposal today. According to the “Liber Pontificalis”, Hyginus was a Greek by birth. The further statement that he was previously a philosopher is probably founded on the similarity of his name with that of two Latin authors. Irenaeus says (Against Heresies III.3) that the Gnostic Valentine came to Rome in Hyginus’s time, remaining there until Anicetus became pontiff. Cerdo, another Gnostic and predecessor of Marcion, also lived at Rome in the reign of Hyginus; by confessing his errors and recanting he succeeded in obtaining readmission into the bosom of the Church, but eventually he fell back into the heresies and was expelled from the Church. How many of these events took place during the time of Hyginus is not known. The “Liber Pontificalis” also relates that this pope organized the hierarchy and established the order of ecclesiastical precedence (Hic clerum composuit et distribuit gradus). This general observation recurs also in the biography of Pope Hormisdas; it has no historical value, and according to Duchesne, the writer probably referred to the lower orders of the clergy. Eusebius (Church History IV.16) claims that Hyginus’s pontificate lasted four years. The ancient authorities contain no information as to his having died a martyr. At his death he was buried on the Vatican Hill, near the tomb of St. Peter. His feast is celebrated on 11 January.

Sources
DUCHESNE, (ed.) Liber Pontificalis, I, 131; Acta Ss., Jan. I, 665; HARNACK, Geschichte der altchristl. Literatur, II: Die Chronologie, I (Leipzig, 1897), 144 sq.

About this page
APA citation. Kirsch, J.P. (1910). Pope St. Hyginus. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.

MLA citation. Kirsch, Johann Peter. “Pope St. Hyginus.” The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. June 1, 1910. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

Mystery of the Vocation of the Magi: Part 5

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Mystery of the Vocation of the Magi

A reflection each day during the Octave of the Epiphany
by Dom Prosper Gueranger, 1870

January 11th: The Sixth Day
Within the Octave of the Epiphany

The Magi were not satisfied with paying their adorations to the great King, whom Mary presented to them. After the example of the Queen of Saba, who paid her homage to the Prince of Peace, in the person of King Solomon, these three Eastern Kings opened their treasures, and presented their offerings to Jesus. Our Emmanuel graciously accepted these mystic gifts, and suffered them not to leave him until he had loaded them with gifts infinitely more precious than those he had vouchsafed to receive. The Magi had given him of the riches which this earth produces; Jesus repays them with heavenly gifts. He strengthened in their hearts the virtues of faith, hope, and charity; he enriched, in their persons, the Church of which they were the representatives; and the words of the Canticle of Mary were fulfilled in them: He hath filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he hath sent empty away (St. Luke, i. 53), for the Synagogue refused to follow them in their search after the King of the Jews. Continue reading

Mystery of the Vocation of the Magi: Part 4

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Mystery of the Vocation of the Magi

A reflection each day during the Octave of the Epiphany
by Dom Prosper Gueranger, 1870

January 10th: The Fifth Day
Within the Octave of the Epiphany

The Magi have reached Bethlehem; the humble dwelling of the King of the Jews has been thrown open to them; there, says St. Matthew, they found the Child, with Mary His Mother (St. Matth. ii. 11). Falling down, they adore the divine King they have so fervently sought after, and for whom the whole earth has been longing. Continue reading