John England

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John England

First Bishop of Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A.; b. 23 September, 1786, in Cork, Ireland; d. at Charleston, 11 April, 1842. He was educated in Cork until his fifteenth year, was then taught privately for two years, and entered Carlow College, 31 August, 1803. In his nineteenth year he began to deliver catechetical instructions in the parish chapel and zealously instructed the soldiers in garrison at Cork. He also established a female reformatory together with male and female poor schools. Out of these schools grew the Presentation Convent. He was ordained priest in Cork, 10 October, 1809, and was appointed lecturer at the cathedral. Wherever he preached people thronged to hear him. Pending the opening of the Magdalen Asylum he maintained and ministered to many applicants. In the same year he published the “Religious Repertory”, established a circulating library in the parish of St. Mary, Shandon, and attended the city jail. In the elections of 1812 he fearlessly exerted his influence, maintaining that, “in vindicating the political rights of his countrymen, he was but asserting their liberty of conscience”. In the same year he was appointed president of the new diocesan College of St. Mary, where he taught theology. In 1814 he vigorously and successfully assailed with tongue and pen the insidious Veto measure which threatened disaster to the Church in Ireland. Next to O’Connell’s his influence was the greatest in the agitation which culminated in Catholic Emancipation. To help this cause he founded “The Chronicle” which he continued to edit until he left Ireland. in 1817 he was appointed parish priest of Bandon. (The bigotry and prejudice of this city at that time may be conjectured from the inscription over its gates: “Turk, Jew or Atheist may enter here, but not a Papist.”) In spite of the prejudices which he found there, he soon conciliated men of every sect and party. Continue reading

Instruction and Reflection on Paschaltide: The Resurrection Foretold

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Paschaltide Devotions in Honor of the Resurrection of Our Divine Lord

Instruction and Reflection on Paschaltide

“Christ, our Passover, has been sacrificed.” (1 Cor. 5:7) Glory be to the Father…

I. The Resurrection Foretold

“My Flesh dwells in obscurity. For Thou wilt not abandon Me to the underworld; nor wilt Thou permit Thy Holy One to see corruption.” (Psalm 15:9-10)

“For even as Jonas was in the belly of the fish three days and three nights, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.” (Matt. 20:18-19)

“Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” (John 2:19) Our Father…

“After I have risen, I will go before you into Galilee…” (Mark 14:28)

Let us Pray. Grant, we beseech Thee, O Almighty God, that we who celebrate the Feast of Easter, may with Thy help show its effects in our lives; through Christ Our Lord. Amen.

Sequence: “Victimae Paschali Laudes”
Sunday and Thursday

Christ the Lord is risen today, Christians, haste your vows to pay;
Offer ye your praises meet at the Paschal Victim’s feet.

For the sheep the Lamb hath bled, sinless in the sinner’s stead.
Christ the Lord is risen on high; now He lives, no more to die.

Christ, the Victim undefiled, man to God hath reconciled;
When in strange and awful strife met together Death and Life;

Christians, on this happy day haste with joy your vows to pay.
Christ the Lord is risen on high; now He lives, no more to die.

Say, O wond’ring Mary, say, what thou sawest on thy way.
“I beheld where Jesus had lain, empty tomb and Angels twain;

I beheld the glory bright of the Risen Lord of Light:
Christ my hope is risen again; now He lives, and lives to reign.”

Christ, Who once for sinners bled, now the First-born from the dead,
Throned in endless might and power, lives and reigns forevermore.

Hail, Eternal Hope on high! Hail, Thou King of victory!
Hail, Thou Prince of Life adored! Help and save us, gracious Lord.
Amen. Alleluia!

“Worthy is the Lamb Who was slain to receive power and divinity and wisdom and strength and honor and glory and blessing. (Apoc. 5:12)

Let us Pray. Accept, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the prayers of Thy people with the oblation of sacrifice; that these Paschal mysteries which we have begun may by Thy grace afford us a healing remedy unto everlasting life; through Christ Our Lord. Amen.

To Mary Magdalene–

“But Mary was standing outside weeping at the tomb. . . Jesus said to her, ‘Woman, why art thou weeping? Whom dost thou seek?’ She, thinking it was the gardener, said to Him, “Sir, if thou hast removed Him, tell me where thou hast laid Him and I will take Him away.’ Jesus said to her, ‘Mary!’ Turning, she said to Him, ‘Rabboni!’ (that is to say, Master). Jesus said to her, ‘Do not touch Me, for I have not yet ascended to My Father, but go to My brethren and say to them, I ascend to My Father and to your Father, to My God and your God.’ Mary Magdalene came, and announced to the disciples, ‘I have seen the Lord, and these things He said to me.” (John 20:11f.).

Let us Pray. We beg Thee, O Lord, grant us ever to find joy through these Paschal mysteries, so that the continual work of our reparation may be for us the source of unending bliss; through Christ Our Lord. Amen.

Hymn — Regina Cæli Laetare

Queen of Heaven, rejoice; Alleluia!
For He Whom thou didst merit to bear; Alleluia!
Has risen as He said; Alleluia!
Pray for us to God. Alleluia!

V. Rejoice and be glad, O Virgin Mary, Alleluia;
R. For the Lord has truly risen, Alleluia!

Let us Pray. O God, Who by the Resurrection of Thy Son, Our Lord Jesus Christ, has vouchsafed to make glad the whole world, grant, we beseech Thee, that through the intercession of the Virgin Mary, His Mother, we may attain the joys of eternal life; through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

St. Zeno

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St. Zeno, Bishop of Verona, Confessor

A.D. 380.

THIS holy prelate is styled a martyr by St. Gregory the Great, 1 and in several martyrologies. But was honoured only with the title of confessor, in the ancient missal of Verona, before the time of Lewis Lippoman, bishop of that city, in 1548: 2 and it appears, from the manner in which St. Ambrose, who was his contemporary, writing to Syagrius, oursaint’s successor, speaks of his happy death, and extols his eminent sanctity, that he did not die by the sword. 3 Living in the days of Constantius, Julian, and Valens, he might deserve the title of martyr, by sharing in the persecutions carried on by those princes. Hence, in some calendars, he is styled martyr, in others confessor. 1 Continue reading