St. Lazarus of Bethany

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St. Lazarus of Bethany

Reputed first Bishop of Marseilles, died in the second half of the first century.

According to a tradition, or rather a series of traditions combined at different epochs, the members of the family at Bethany, the friends of Christ, together with some holy women and others of His disciples, were put out to sea by the Jews hostile to Christianity in a vessel without sails, oars, or helm, and after a miraculous voyage landed in Provence at a place called today the Saintes-Maries. It is related that they separated there to go and preach the Gospel in different parts of the southeast of Gaul. Lazarus, of whom alone we have to treat here, went to Marseilles, and, having converted a number of its inhabitants to Christianity, became their first pastor. During the first persecution under Nero he hid himself in a crypt, over which the celebrated Abbey of St.-Victor was constructed in the fifth century. In this same crypt he was interred, when he shed his blood for the faith. During the new persecution of Domitian he was cast into prison and beheaded in a spot which is believed to be identical with a cave beneath the prison Saint-Lazare. His body was later translated to Autun, and buried in the cathedral of that town. But the inhabitants of Marseilles claim to be in possession of his head which they still venerate. Continue reading

Thoughts for Gaudete Sunday: Mary’s Healing Humility 

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Thoughts for Gaudete Sunday
Mary’s Healing Humility

Humility is an unpopular—one might say barely considered, hence untaught—virtue, but it is the key to developing a fully virtuous life and a just society. The practice of humility does not allow one to serve a perception of one’s own power, nor to reduce other people to “things” or objects. Rather, rather it forces one to consider and respect his neighbour; it understands the privilege of knowing and serving the other.

Humility is the gateway virtue that trains us in all of the other heavenly virtues: Kindness, because it remembers receiving kindness; Patience, because it has experienced impatience; Diligence and Charity, because it has seen the rewards of both; Temperance, because a humble soul is one that takes less, rather than more; Chastity, because humility recognizes the beauty of God’s plan, and reverences His image in others. This is the best restraint.

Grave sin will be with us unto ages of ages, but grace can abound, and it can bring light into the dark places; it can heal the festering wounds whether emotional or spiritual. But we have to want it, and ask for it.

It is an open secret: Pursuing humility—asking for the grace of the virtue of humility, and then practising it—is a way to begin. Remember, says St. Bernard, that Mary pleased God by her purity but conceived Him by her humility.

Introitus: Gaudéte in Dómino

Dominica III Adventus ~ I. classis

Introitus
Phil 4:4-6

Gaudéte in Dómino semper: íterum dico, gaudéte. Modéstia vestra nota sit ómnibus homínibus: Dóminus enim prope est. Nihil sollíciti sitis: sed in omni oratióne petitiónes vestræ innotéscant apud Deum.

Rejoice in the Lord always: again I say, rejoice. Let you moderation be known to all men: for the Lord is near. Have no anxiety, but in everything, by prayer let your petitions be made known to God.

Ps 84:2

Benedixísti, Dómine, terram tuam: avertísti captivitátem Iacob.

You have favored, O Lord, Your land; You have restored the well-being of Jacob.

V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculórum. Amen

V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
R. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Gaudéte in Dómino semper: íterum dico, gaudéte. Modéstia vestra nota sit ómnibus homínibus: Dóminus enim prope est. Nihil sollíciti sitis: sed in omni oratióne petitiónes vestræ innotéscant apud Deum.

Rejoice in the Lord always: again I say, rejoice. Let you moderation be known to all men: for the Lord is near. Have no anxiety, but in everything, by prayer let your petitions be made known to God.

INSTRUCTION FOR THE THIRD SUNDAY IN ADVENT

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INSTRUCTION FOR THE THIRD SUNDAY IN ADVENT

The Church’s Year
Rev. Fr. Leonard Goffine

On this Sunday again, the Church calls on us to rejoice in the Advent of the Redeemer, and at the Introit sings:

INTROIT Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice. Let your modesty be known to all men: for the Lord is nigh. Be nothing solicitous; but in every thing by prayer let your requests be made known to God (Phil. 4). Lord, thou hast blessed thy land; thou hast turned away the captivity of Jacob (Ps. 84). Glory be to the Father.

COLLECT Incline Thine ear, O Lord, we beseech Thee, unto our prayers: and enlighten the darkness of our mind by the grace of thy visitation. Through our Lord.

EPISTLE (Phil. 4:4-7). Brethren, rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice. Let your modesty be known to all men. The Lord is nigh. Be nothing solicitous; but in everything, by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving, let your petitions be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasseth all understanding, keep your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus our Lord. Continue reading