Feast of the Patronage of Our Lady

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Feast of the Patronage of Our Lady

It was first permitted by Decree of the Sacred Congregation of Rites, 6 May, 1679, for all the provinces of Spain, in memory of the victories obtained over the Saracens, heretics, and other enemies from the sixth century to the reign of Philip IV. Benedict XII ordered it to be kept in the Papal States on the third Sunday of November. To other places it is granted, on request, for some Sunday in November, to be designated by the ordinary. The Office is taken entirely from the Common of the Blessed Virgin, and the Mass is the “Salve sancta parens”. In many places the feast of the Patronage is held with an additional title of Queen of All Saints, of Mercy, Mother of Graces. The Greeks have no feast of this kind, but the Ruthenians, followed by all the Slavs of the Greek Rite, have a feast, called “Patrocinii sanctissimæ Dominæ” etc., or Pokrov Bogorodicy, on 1 October, which, however, would seem to correspond more with our Feast of the Scapular.

NILLES, Kalendarium Manuale, II, 532; BENEDICT XIV, De festis, II, 173, 174; MARTINOV, Précis historiques (1858), July.

APA citation. Mershman, F. (1911). Feast of the Patronage of Our Lady. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.

MLA citation. Mershman, Francis. “Feast of the Patronage of Our Lady.” The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 11. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. February 1, 1911. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

 

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Introitus: Dicit Dóminus

Dominica XXIII Post Pentecosten III. Novembris ~ II. classis

Introitus
Ier 29:11; 29:12; 29:14

Dicit Dóminus: Ego cógito cogitatiónes pacis, et non afflictiónis: invocábitis me, et ego exáudiam vos: et redúcam captivitátem vestram de cunctis locis.

The Lord says: “I think thoughts of peace, and not of affliction. You shall call upon Me, and I will hear you; and I will bring back your captivity from all places.”

Ps 84:2
Benedixísti, Dómine, terram tuam: avertísti captivitátem Iacob.

You have favored, O Lord, Your land; You have restored the well-being of Jacob.

V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculórum. Amen

V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
R. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Dicit Dóminus: Ego cógito cogitatiónes pacis, et non afflictiónis: invocábitis me, et ego exáudiam vos: et redúcam captivitátem vestram de cunctis locis.

The Lord says: “I think thoughts of peace, and not of affliction. You shall call upon Me, and I will hear you; and I will bring back your captivity from all places.”

Instruction for Twenty-Third Sunday After Pentecost

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Instruction for Twenty-Third Sunday After Pentecost

The Church’s Year
Rev. Fr. Leonard Goffine

REMARK If from Pentecost until Advent there be only twenty-three Sundays, the following one is omitted, and the Mass of the twenty-fourth is said.

The Introit of the Mass consoles and incites us to confidence in God who is so benevolent towards us, and will not let us pine away in tribulation. The Lord saith: I think thoughts of peace, and not of affliction: you shall call upon me, and I will hear you: and I will bring back your captivity from all places. (Fer. XXIX. 11. 12. 14.) Lord, thou hast blessed thy land: thou hast turned away the captivity of Jacob. (Ps. LXXXIV.) Glory etc.

COLLECT Absolve, we beseech Thee, 0 Lord, Thy people from their offences: that through Thy bountiful goodness we may be freed from the bonds of those sins which through our frailty we have contracted. Thro’, Continue reading