Introitus: Dignus est Agnus

In festo Domino nostro Jesu Christi Regis ~ I. classis

Introitus
Apoc 5:12; 1:6

Dignus est Agnus, qui occísus est, accípere virtútem, et divinitátem, et sapiéntiam, et fortitúdinem, et honórem. Ipsi glória et impérium in sǽcula sæculórum.

Worthy is the Lamb Who was slain to receive power, and divinity, and wisdom, and strength, and honor. To Him belong glory and dominion forever and ever.

Ps 71:1
Deus, iudícium tuum Regi da: et iustítiam tuam Fílio Regis.

O God, with Your judgment endow the King and with Your justice, the King’s son.

V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculórum. Amen

V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
R. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Dignus est Agnus, qui occísus est, accípere virtútem, et divinitátem, et sapiéntiam, et fortitúdinem, et honórem. Ipsi glória et impérium in sǽcula sæculórum.

Worthy is the Lamb Who was slain to receive power, and divinity, and wisdom, and strength, and honor. To Him belong glory and dominion forever and ever.

FEAST OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST THE KING

Image may contain: 1 person, beard

FEAST OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST THE KING

(Last Sunday in October)

** Christ the King **It was no new truth, no new cult even, that Pope Pius XI announced, when in His Encyclical of December 11, 1925, he introduced into the sacred liturgy of the Church the special festival of Christ the King. The beautiful truth of the Kingship of Christ runs like a thread of royal purple throughout the prayers of the Christian ages. It may be said to have been an intimate part of the Old Testament liturgy and worship, especially in the Psalms and the Prophecies. With the coming of the fullness of time, all these predictions passed into realization. Christ affirmed before the world His Kingdom and Kingship. The three Holy Kings announced it at His Birth. In person He declared it to Pilate. As a King He pictured Himself to the Jews when He foretold His judgment of the world. As a King the Apocalyse presents Hm to us. And as a King He will finally surrender Himself and His Kingdom to the Father.

It is an article of our holy Faith that Christ, as man, has fullest spiritual power, leading to salvation, establishing the Church and Her Sacraments, and disposing of all graces in the supernatural order. In virtue of the union of His human nature with the Divine, He possesses still greater power, which is the foundation of this Feast. His is the full triple power of royalty: He is supreme Lawgiver under God, and His legislation all are bound to obey; He is ultimate Judge over mankind; He is the sovereign Executive whose command everyone must heed and whose sentence no one can escape. The sphere of His Kingly dominion embraces in their entirety both the temporal and spiritual realms.

Devotion to Our Lord Jesus Christ the King, offers to all Christians a new social outlook upon the world. We, as individuals, must strive to be subject to Christ most perfectly, in mind, will, and heart, because we are purchased at the price of His own precious Blood. This service should be expressed no less in our domestic relations, so that Christ may be King of the home. Christ is also King of all human society as well as King of nations. The remedy of all our evils is once more to bring society back to the gentle rule of Christ, whose yoke is sweet and whose burden of sovereignty is light. For this reason the whole Church has instituted the great Feast of Our Lord Jesus Christ the King.

MY CATHOLIC FAITH: The Bishop of Rome

Image may contain: 10 people

MY CATHOLIC FAITH

It is Christ’s will that we should reverence His ministers as Himself. This is why Catholics pay the greatest reverence to Christ’s Vicar, the Pope, their universal Father. On this account the title “His Holiness” is given him. Out of respect for his office, the Holy Father is given privileges not granted to other bishops. As a temporal sovereign he has a Court and guards. He has a standard and sea. He has ambassadors. On solemn occasions he is carried in the papal chair called sedia gestatoria.

LVI. The Bishop of Rome

Did Christ intend that the special power of chief teacher and ruler of the entire Church should be exercised by Peter alone? –Christ did not intend that the special power of chief teacher and ruler of the entire Church should be exercised by Peter alone, but intended that this power should be passed down to his successor, the Pope, Bishop of Rome, who is the Vicar of Christ on earth, and the visible Head of the Church. Continue reading

Sts. Simon and St. Jude

Image may contain: 1 person, sitting, child and beard

Sts. Simon and St. Jude, Apostles

St. Simon, whose festival the Catholic Church commemorates to-day, was surnamed the Cananaean or Canaanite, because he was born at Cana, a town in Galilee. In this town, Jesus wrought his first miracle, by changing water into wine, as is known from the Gospel. Nicephorus and some others are of opinion, that Simon was the bridegroom whose wedding our Lord and His holy Mother honored with their presence, but that he afterwards left his bride with her consent and followed Christ. St. Jude, the brother of Simon, is called Thaddseus to distinguish him from the other Jude or Judas’ who betrayed and sold the Lord. According to Nicephorus, Mary Cleophas was their mother, and James the Less their brother. Other writers say that Simon and Jude were not brothers. The Gospel tells us that both Simon and Jude were chosen by Christ as Apostles; but when or under what circumstances this took place, is not recorded, nor have any particulars of their words and actions been left us. There is, however, not the slightest doubt that they, as all the others, constantly followed the Saviour, and although they forsook Him when He was taken prisoner, they had, after His resurrection the grace to see Him frequently, to be present at His Ascension, and to receive the Holy Ghost on Pentecost. Continue reading

The Battle of Milvian Bridge

Image may contain: 2 people

The Battle of Milvian Bridge

An account of the Life of the Blessed Emperor Constantine
By Eusebius of Caesarea

CHAPTER XXXVII: Defeat of Maxentius’s Armies in Italy.

Constantine, however, filled with compassion on account of all these miseries, began to arm himself with all warlike preparation against the tyranny. Assuming therefore the Supreme God as his patron, and invoking His Christ to be his preserver and aid, and setting the victorious trophy, the salutary symbol, in front of his soldiers and body- guard, he marched with his whole forces, trying to obtain again for the Romans the freedom they had inherited from their ancestors.

And whereas, Maxentius, trusting more in his magic arts than in the affection of his subjects, dared not even advance outside the city gates, (1) but had guarded every place and district and city subject to his tyranny, with large bodies of soldiers, (2) the emperor, confiding in the help of God, advanced against the first and second and third divisions of the tyrant’s forces, defeated them all with ease at the first assault, (3) and made his way into the very interior of Italy. Continue reading