Introitus: Omnia quae fecisti

Dominica XX Post Pentecosten IV. Octobris ~ II. classis

Introitus
Dan 3:31; 31:29; 31:35

Omnia, quæ fecísti nobis, Dómine, in vero iudício fecísti, quia peccávimus tibi et mandátis tuis non oboedívimus: sed da glóriam nómini tuo, et fac nobíscum secúndum multitúdinem misericórdiæ tuæ.

All that You have done to us, O Lord, You have done in true judgment; because we have sinned against You, and we have not obeyed your commandments; but give glory to Your name, and deal with us according to the multitude of Your mercy.

Ps 118:1
Beáti immaculáti in via: qui ámbulant in lege Dómini.

Happy are they whose way is blameless, who walk in the law of the Lord.

V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculórum. Amen

V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
R. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Omnia, quæ fecísti nobis, Dómine, in vero iudício fecísti, quia peccávimus tibi et mandátis tuis non oboedívimus: sed da glóriam nómini tuo, et fac nobíscum secúndum multitúdinem misericórdiæ tuæ.

All that You have done to us, O Lord, You have done in true judgment; because we have sinned against You, and we have not obeyed your commandments; but give glory to Your name, and deal with us according to the multitude of Your mercy.

Instruction for the Twentieth Sunday After Pentecost

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Instruction for the Twentieth Sunday After Pentecost

The Church’s Year
By Rev. Fr. Leonard Goffine

The Introit of the Mass is an humble prayer, by which we acknowledge that we are punished for our disobedience:

INTROIT All that thou hast done to us, O. Lord, thou hast done in true judgment: because we have sinned against thee, and have not obeyed thy commandments: but give glory to thy name, and deal with us according to the multitude of thy mercy. (Dan. III. 28.) Blessed are the undefiled in the way: who walk in the law of the Lord. (Fs. CXVIII.). Glory etc.

COLLECT Grant, we beseech Thee, O Lord, in Thy mercy to Thy faithful pardon and peace; that they may both be cleansed from all their offences, and serve Thee with a quiet mind. Thro’.

EPISTLE (Ephes. V. 15-21.) Brethren, See how you walk circumspectly, not as unwise, but as wise redeeming the time, because the days are evil. Wherefore, become not unwise, but understanding what is the will of God. And be not drunk with wine, wherein is luxury: but be ye filled with the Holy Spirit, speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns, and spiritual canticles, singing and making melody in your hearts to the Lord: giving thanks always for all things, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, to God and the Father; being subject one to another in the fear of Christ. Continue reading

MY CATHOLIC FAITH: The Catholic Eastern Church and Rites

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MY CATHOLIC FAITH

LV. The Catholic Eastern Church; Rites

The essential acts of the Liturgy are three: the prayers of the priesthood in the Divine Office (represented by the first angel), the Mass (represented by the second angel), and the sacraments (represented by the third angel). The term “rite” is sometimes used to refer to the liturgy according to some definite custom and language. “Rite” may also designate in a narrow sense some particular liturgical ceremony; in this way we have the “rite of Baptism”, etc.

What is the Catholic Eastern Church? –It is that part of the Church in the East which, although using liturgies and rites differing from those of the Latin (or Western) Church centered at Rome, subscribe to the same doctrines, and recognize the same Sovereign Pontiff, thus belonging to the same Universal and True Church.

The Catholic Eastern Church includes the following: Byzantines, Syrians, Copts, Ethiopians, Chaldeans, Armenians, Malabarese, and Maronites.
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St. Hilarion

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St. Hilarion, Abbot

The Roman Martyrology mentions to-day, St. Hilarion, whose life was written by St. Jerome. He was born, in the year 288, at Tabatha, near Gaza in Palestine, of heathen parents. While still a boy, he was sent to Alexandria to study. Making the acquaintance of some Christians, he became converted, and from that hour, he was no more seen at the theatres of the heathens, but only in the assemblies of the faithful. His conduct was so blameless and edifying, that it put many, though born in Christianity, to shame. At that time, the austere and holy life led by St. Antony in the deserts of Egypt, was much spoken of. Hilarion was filled with the desire to see this holy man, and to learn from him how to become a Saint. Hence he went to him, observed carefully all his actions, and endeavored to follow in his footsteps. Having passed two months under so famous a teacher, he acquainted him with his wish to lead a solitary life and to serve God in a desert. Antony, praising his desire, gave him some wholesome instructions in regard to it, and then dismissed him. Hilarion returned to his native place, and as his parents had meanwhile died, he gave to the poor the large fortune which he had inherited, and went to a desert in Egypt, a mile and a half from Majuma.  Continue reading

St. Ursula and Her Companions

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St. Ursula and Her Companions, Virgins

To-day we commemorate the festival of St. Ursula and her companions. Although her life and martyrdom are variously described by different historians, we cannot therefore conclude with some heretical writers, that she never existed, and that all that has been told of her are fables; for, although historians differ in some points, yet all unanimously declare that St. Ursula and her companions sacrificed their lives for their faith, and in defence of their virginity. The short sketch we give of this Saint is partly taken from the works of the celebrated Baronius, and partly from the Roman Breviary. Continue reading